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AUTHOR INTERVIEW w/BLOGS of a BLONDE BOOKIE!

February 6, 2016

brookeburgess

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Hey friends — hope that 2016 finds you all happy and healthy and diving into fresh creative ventures!

Thought I’d share a snippet from a recent interview with a cool book blogger that just got posted. We cover lots of ground (yeah, I’m not just pimping this time :P), so be sure to click through to the full meal deal at the bottom of this post!

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YOUR CAT IS GORGEOUS! SO TELL US BROOKE, WHEN AND HOW DID YOU BECOME A WRITER?

I just kinda stumbled into it by following the path of least resistance. I used to get in trouble in school for daydreaming, scribbling poetry, and writing short stories. That graduated into crafting tabletop role-playing campaigns and videogame concepts. My grades in English and Creative Writing remained strong throughout university, and as a part-time actor (yes…I dabbled) I began to write scripts for self-produced Fringe Festival plays.

With a few awards under my belt and an offer to write and produce big titles for an AAA videogame company, I guess that’s when it started to feel like being a ‘writer’ was a real thing.

WOW! THOSE ARE TRULY HUGE ACCOMPLISHMENTS. THE STUFF THAT WRITERS DREAM ABOUT. WITH ALL THAT IN YOUR WHEELHOUSE, WHAT WOULD YOU SAY IS YOUR GREATEST WRITING ACHIEVEMENT?

I hate to choose between my ‘children’, as even some of the shortest pieces inspired some pride, and seemed to make a memorable impact. But I would have to say that the 3 YEARS spent writing and producing the world’s first ‘Motion Comic Epic’ – BROKEN SAINTS (www.brokensaints.com) — garnered the most acclaim/awards, and reached a worldwide audience on the web that was hungry for smart, scary, and (dare I say it) spiritual storytelling.

BROKEN SAINTS LOOKS AMAZING! I JUST MAY BECOME A HUGE FAN. SO WITH ALL YOUR EXPERIENCE, WHAT DO YOU THINK IS THE HARDEST THING ABOUT BEING A WRITER?

The isolation. It’s an incredibly lonely profession, and it’s often harder for writers vs other artists to connect ‘in the flesh’ with their audience. Musicians and actors and dancers do live performances. Painters and visual artists can do gallery showings. But poor writers work in a vacuum by comparison, so we have to have a lot of faith that our stories aren’t just pebbles getting tossed in the big, black Ocean…

Click here the rest of the interview.

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